today is an ‘i really miss LA’ day

wonder if the three inches of snow on the ground and ongoing snowfall from the sky here have anything to do with this.

i did put a brisket in the slowcooker, though, so … i don’t know. it’ll end sometime? winter will stop coming?

Grading

I’m going to finish it if it kills me. (it very well might kill me.)

Protip: the easiest way to not get any points on a question is to not answer it. If the question asks for an example from the cases, give one. It doesn’t matter how much you write if none of the words actually answer the question asked of you.

Jimmy Eat World - Disintegration 

(Source: youtube.com)

Tags: sigh

Bad day so far

Learned friends mother died Looming government shutdown De Anza rape case verdict Dodgers hired Bratton to do their security Broke my toe this morning Entering day 8 of a protracted battle with the pharmacy that shows no sign of resolution Aforementioned concerns about power protecting power

do you sometimes feel too calm? too serene? not worried about anything, optimistic about the current state of the world? do you wish there was a way to get more instant information about current emergency, short term problems, long term problems, tsunamis, earthquakes, “mass death of animals,” supervolcanos, and the artfully described “earth approaching objects?” because WOW do i have the website for you, or rather the RSOE emergency and disaster information service in budapest, hungary, has a website for you. it has a constantly updated map with everything that is wrong, and the things that going wrong RIGHT THIS SECOND also flash. did you know that flash floods in brazil required about 30,000 people to evacuate from their homes and destroyed at least 8,000 homes to date? i did not, in large part because i keep trying to understand all the technical details of nuclear reactors. unfortunately not enough to understand whether the release of demineralized water from an ontario nuclear generation station due to pump seal failure is a big deal or not. (not, right?)
an extra added bonus is the news crawl at the top with the climate change news: “ice sheets melting faster than earlier estimates.” awesome! awesome.

do you sometimes feel too calm? too serene? not worried about anything, optimistic about the current state of the world? do you wish there was a way to get more instant information about current emergency, short term problems, long term problems, tsunamis, earthquakes, “mass death of animals,” supervolcanos, and the artfully described “earth approaching objects?” because WOW do i have the website for you, or rather the RSOE emergency and disaster information service in budapest, hungary, has a website for you. it has a constantly updated map with everything that is wrong, and the things that going wrong RIGHT THIS SECOND also flash. did you know that flash floods in brazil required about 30,000 people to evacuate from their homes and destroyed at least 8,000 homes to date? i did not, in large part because i keep trying to understand all the technical details of nuclear reactors. unfortunately not enough to understand whether the release of demineralized water from an ontario nuclear generation station due to pump seal failure is a big deal or not. (not, right?)

an extra added bonus is the news crawl at the top with the climate change news: “ice sheets melting faster than earlier estimates.” awesome! awesome.

 It shows the percentage of people who (a) benefit from various programs, and (b) claim in response to a government survey that they ‘have not used a government social program.’  because the US welfare state is ‘submerged’ and sliced up among a variety of different programs, many of which operate indirectly rather than directly, it is mostly invisible to US citizens. This has obvious political consequences - ‘government social programs’ are equated to ‘welfare’ and stigmatized. The fact that nearly half of Social Security recipients do not believe that they have benefited from a government social program, and that the same is true of some 40% ofG.I. Bill beneficiaries and Medicare recipients is a rather extraordinary one. (Monkey Cage)

 It shows the percentage of people who (a) benefit from various programs, and (b) claim in response to a government survey that they ‘have not used a government social program.’  because the US welfare state is ‘submerged’ and sliced up among a variety of different programs, many of which operate indirectly rather than directly, it is mostly invisible to US citizens. This has obvious political consequences - ‘government social programs’ are equated to ‘welfare’ and stigmatized. The fact that nearly half of Social Security recipients do not believe that they have benefited from a government social program, and that the same is true of some 40% ofG.I. Bill beneficiaries and Medicare recipients is a rather extraordinary one. (Monkey Cage)

Tags: WOW sigh wowsigh

Californians object to increasing taxes in order to pare the state’s massive budget deficit, and instead favor closing the breach through spending cuts. But they oppose cuts—and even prefer more spending—on programs that make up 85% of the state’s general fund obligations, a new Los Angeles Times/USC Poll has found. That paradox rests on Californians’ firm belief that the state’s deficit—estimated last week at nearly $25 billion over the next 18 months—can be squared through trimming waste and inefficiencies rather than cutting the programs they hold dear. Despite tens of billions that have been cut from the state budget in recent years, just a quarter of California voters believed that state services would have to be curtailed to close the deficit.

Only one in four voters favored trimming elementary and high schools, which make up almost 42% of state general fund spending. Just over one-third approved of cuts to state colleges and universities, or, separately, to state-financed health care for children or the poor, the poll found. The only state-financed enterprise that voters favored chopping was the prison system, which more than 70% of voters wanted to cut either minimally or by a large amount.

Voters rejected Proposition 21, which would have raised the state’s vehicle license fee by a mere $18 to support California’s beleaguered state park system (which currently has a maintenance backlog of more than $1 billion); they approved Proposition 22, which prevents the state taking transportation monies from local governments and whole bunch of other stealth things to tighten the state’s budget; and most importantly, they approved Proposition 26, another stealth initiative sponsored by Chevron, Philip Morris, and Anheuser-Busch, which erases the distinction between “fees” and “taxes”, might undo this year’s budget deal, further restricts the state’s ability to raise revenue, and probably emasculates the state’s environmental agencies (potentially making the victory in Prop 23 meaningless).

Essentially, then, the voters have given formal political power to the Democrats, and told them to fix the state’s problems. They then have tied the Democrats in a series of straitjackets and thrown them into the Pacific Ocean.

Tags: SIGH

A supplemental appropriations bill that passed the House earlier this month would take $400 million from post-Katrina recovery programs like Road Home in order to fund other projects, including $304 million for Deepwater Horizon-related remediation and investigation. To some Louisiana residents, using any taxpayer money, much less hurricane-relief money, to clean up BP’s oil just adds insult to injury. “Any provisions related to the spill should be paid for by the responsible party,” says Monika Gerhart, director of policy and government relations for the Equity and Inclusion Campaign, a nonpartisan advocacy organization. “We’re not yet recovered. So don’t take our housing money.”

For anyone who hasn’t been to New Orleans lately, here’s an update: It still needs so much work that visitors pay to take “disaster tours." In a June 7 letter to the House Committee on Appropriations, Louisiana Recovery Authority Chairman David Voelker pleaded that the rescission of already-dedicated rebuilding funds be stricken from the bill. Without them, Voelker estimates, 19,000 homes statewide will go unrestored, nearly 7,000 of them in Orleans Parish. "If you just drive around, you can see the people need it," says Taylor Henry, communications director for Republican Congressman Anh "Joseph" Cao, whose district includes New Orleans.

Ms. Cerbelli who lost her 30-year-old son, Kevin, on the night of Oct. 25, 1998, and has long hoped to change police training and policy regarding the handling of emotionally disturbed persons, or, in police shorthand, E.D.P.’s. Mr. Cerbelli was incoherent and hostile when he walked, shirtless, into the station house of the 110th Precinct in Elmhurst, carrying a knife, a screwdriver and a rosary. He tried to stab an officer with the screwdriver, but the officer’s bulletproof vest stopped it. Several officers loosely surrounded Mr. Cerbelli in a partial circle, a tactic taught to cadets and generally known as a “zone of safety.” In this and other cases, the zone turned lethal. After officers simultaneously shouted at Mr. Cerbelli to drop his weapons, three of them opened fire, killing him and wounding a lieutenant with a ricochet shot, according to court filings.

The lawsuit, filed in 1999 in United States District Court for the Eastern District, sought $90 million. Instead, Ms. Cerbelli got a two-hour meeting, to take place on or before July 30 at the Police Academy, that her lawyers called unprecedented.

Ms. Cerbelli’s lawsuit initially called for substantive changes to the department’s policy manual, the Patrol Guide. But in 2008, the city won its argument for summary judgment and was removed from the case. Any chance of putting the Patrol Guide on trial also evaporated, leaving Ms. Cerbelli with the prospect of going to trial against two remaining police officers.

Now, with the case settled, there is no guarantee of any changes. The police are not obligated to take any action after the meeting.